Monday, April 1, 2019

Francisco Ramirez, Stanford University Graduate School of Education

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, April 8, 2019

Melissa Valentine, Stanford University School of Engineering

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, April 15, 2019

Jerry Jacobs, University of Pennsylvania and Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford (CASBS)

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, April 22, 2019

Dan Schwartz, Stanford University Graduate School of Education

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

*Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Sarah Brayne, The University of Texas at Austin
-Special Seminar co-sponsored by Sociology at Stanford-

*NOTE DIFFERENT DAY, TIME, AND LOCATION*

Time and Location: *TBA*

Sociology at Stanford is community of sociological scholars on the Sanford campus comprised of members from the Stanford Sociology Department, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and SCANCOR

Monday, April 29, 2019

Angèle Christin, Stanford University, Department of Communication

Data at Work: Web Journalists and Algorithmic Publics in the United States and France

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Over the past decades, many skilled occupations that were formerly protected from quantitative evaluation have been confronted with the multiplication of algorithms and analytics drawing on ‘Big Data.’ These technologies are usually designed to rationalize expert judgment and make professionals more accountable. Yet the actual ways in which data is used often diverge from their optimistic designs. In this project, I focus on the case of journalism, a field transformed by quantification in the form of traffic numbers, or ‘clicks.’ Drawing on ethnographic methods, I examine the reception of audience analytics in U.S. and French web newsrooms. I find that metrics like clicks take on distinct meanings and are mobilized in different ways depending on their institutional context, with significant consequences for the kind of news being produced. I argue that these differences were shaped by the respective histories of the journalistic field in the two countries, which influenced how journalists made sense of their algorithmic publics through traffic numbers. This study of data at work is part of a broader research program that critically examines how technologies of quantification reconfigure social practices in the digital age.

Monday, May 6, 2019

Julia Kirch Kirkegaard,SCANCOR Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, May 13, 2019

Kari Jalonen, SCANCOR Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, June 3, 2019

Johanna Mair, Hertie School of Governance and Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS)

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)