Monday, October 2, 2017

David Pedulla, Department of Sociology, Stanford University

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, October 16, 2017

Tim Weiss, Fellow, Center for Work, Technology & Organization (WTO), Stanford

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, October 30, 2017

David Obstfeld, California State University-Fullerton

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, November 6, 2017

Klaus Weber, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, November 13, 2017

Julia DiBenigno, Yale School of Management

Rapid Relationality: How Peripheral Experts Develop Influential Relationships with Line Managers

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Organizations often must hire outside professionals for their expertise and legitimacy to accomplish important organizational goals, including sustainability officers, cyber security professionals, and diversity officers, among others. Yet these experts typically belong to peripheral functions of the organization and lack formal authority over line managers in core functions. Given this power asymmetry, line managers may resist efforts to elicit cooperation from them with relative impunity. How and when can low-power experts in peripheral roles elicit cooperation from higher-power line managers? In this paper, I analyze relational histories of 56 peripheral expert-line manager dyads from a 30-month ethnographic field study of experts—in this case U.S. Army mental health professionals—and the line managers over whom they lacked authority—the direct commanders of the soldiers they treated. Soldiers could not fully benefit from mental health services when their commanders overrode their providers’ recommendations. Despite their low-power and status as outsiders, many providers succeeded at developing influential relationships with commanders by using ethnographic access tactics through a process I call “rapid relationality.” My analysis suggests it is not only what peripheral experts do to elicit cooperation from line managers, but also when and how quickly they do it that matters. These findings contribute to our understanding of expert occupational groups working in organizations, influence tactics, and temporal dynamics in organizations.

Monday, November 27, 2017

Kristiina Herold, SCANCOR Postdoctoral Scholar, Stanford University

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Monday, December 4, 2017

Emilio Castilla, MIT
-Special Seminar co-sponsored by Sociology at Stanford-

**NOTE DIFFERENT LOCATION**

Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, *Barnum Hub, 505 Lasuen Mall, Stanford CA 94305*

Sociology at Stanford is community of sociological scholars on the Sanford campus comprised of members from the Stanford Sociology Department, Stanford Graduate School of Business, and SCANCOR