April 4, 2016

Eva Boxenbaum, CBS

Labels, Schemas, and Prototypes: A Cognitive Linguistic Approach to Category Emergence (co-authors: Eero Vaara and Joep Cornelissen)

Time and Location: Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

April 11, 2016

Mike Lounsbury, Alberta School of Business

Gaming a Category: Strategic Differentiation and Conformity in Video Games

Time and Location: Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

Building on the categorization and optimal distinctiveness literatures, we examine how new entrants strategically differentiate themselves within a category, and how different positioning strategies relate to performance. Empirically, we study the U.S. console video game industry where new categories frequently emerge around prototypical hit games. Our data includes both first-hand interviews and a proprietary database of 6544 games comprising 78 emerging categories. We find that in the early stages of new category growth, conformity with or extreme strategic differentiation from the prototype’s features are positively associated with new entrants’ sales, with extreme differentiation leading to the highest rewards. As a category grows further, a moderate level of differentiation becomes important for enhancing sales. Implications for research on categorization and optimal distinctiveness are discussed. 

April 18, 2016

Renate Meyer, WU-Vienna

Recursive Categorization and Enactment of Role Identities In Pluralistic Institutional Contexts

Time and Location: Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

(co-authors: Dennis Jancsary, Markus A. Höllerer, & Vitaliano Barberio)

Our article examines how organizations embody the institutional pluralism that characterizes their environment. Building on phenomenological institutional theory and structural  symbolic interactionism, we explore how the notion of recursive categorization – i.e., the mutually constitutive relationship between typified social role, counter-role, and related action(s) – suggests that a social actor cultivates a nexus of multiple role identities with a particular configuration. We maintain that this patterning, in turn, grants insights into the constellation of plural logics on the field level. Conceptually, we use the constructs of (dis-)similarity, centrality, differentiation, and interconnectedness in order to analyze such a nexus of role-identities, and to reconstruct different constellations of field-level pluralism. Empirically, we employ semantic network analysis to illustrate and further develop our conceptual ideas with a case study of a large and complex public sector organization. Our findings and subsequent theory building have implications for institutional approaches to organizations’ multiple identities by proposing a more nuanced understanding of their properties above and beyond fragmentation or integration. Most prominently, we contribute to recent literature on institutional pluralism by differentiating several forms of pluralism that provide novel insights into the relationships between institutional logics.

May 9, 2016

Rebecca Piekkari, Aalto University

How should we (not) judge the ‘quality’ of qualitative research in International Business? A re-assessment of current evaluative criteria

Time and Location: Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

May 16, 2016

Brayden King, Kellogg School of Management-Northwestern

From Policy to Practice: The Influence of Social Movements on Corporate Policy Implementation

Time and Location: Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)

May 23, 2016

Elisabeth Clemens, University of Chicago and Visiting Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS), Stanford

Reinventing public/private governance

Time and Location: Time and Location: 3:00-4:30 PM, CERAS Building, 520 Galvez Mall, Stanford CA 94305 (Room 123)